Back from retirement

If you’re over 60 and looking for a full-time job or something part-time, you may be feeling discouraged, despite having a lot of experience to offer any future employer. Whether they know it or not, employers may be engaging in 'age profiling'.

There are assumptions that are made about people over 60 that you can overcome, starting with your resume. It's the first impression you'll make, so make it a good one with these tips.

1. Take Care With Your Contact Details

You already know that you need to have your contact details on your resume. If you don't have an email address, now's the time to get one. When you set up your email, try using the format "First name_Last [email protected]" Avoid signifiers of your age, such as including your year of birth in the address, as many do. This will help you make that good first impression without disclosing your age.

A bonus tip is to use Gmail if you don’t already. This will help show recruiters that you know your way around recent technology.

2. Focus On Your Most Recent Experience

The amount of experience you have is an asset to any recruiter, but you do need to be careful with how you lay it out. "Most recruiters will only focus on the last five years of experience, as they're the most relevant," says resume editor Faye Reynolds from writing assistance service Assignment Help. "As this is the case, focus your resume on the most recent experience you have."

It’s also best to focus on the work you've done that's relevant to the field you're applying to now. The side work you did in your teens and 20's will probably not be of interest. If you have a few decades of experience, it's fine to write 'over 15 years experience', and then go into details in your interview.

3. Show That You're Willing To Learn

It's true that many jobs require some technical knowledge, so you'll need to show the recruiter what tech skills you have. A good way of doing so is to use the descriptors “proficient” and “expert.” “Proficient” will show that you know enough to perform the chief functions of a particular program, and “expert” shows that you know how to use every function of the program.

If there are skills you'll know you'll need for a new job, it's worth looking into online tutorials to learn how to use them. They're quite easy to find through a Google search. You can even mention on your resume that you're studying a certain skill, if it's relevant to the job at hand.

4. Use Online Tools to Write Your Resume

There are a lot of tools online that will help you write and proofread your resume. Give some of these a try:

5. List Your Education Strategically

When applying for just about any job, you’ll need to list your education. Many job seekers worry about doing so, as it can give away your age.

When listing your education, list your qualifications and places of education, but leave out the dates. You can go over this in your interview, if the dates are needed. Also, consider putting your education further down your resume. Your experience will be more important as it's more recent.

With these tips, you'll be able to write a resume that will impress recruiters. It's your first impression, so make it count with a resume that highlights your best features as an employee.

Mary Walton proofreads content for Revieweal, an online service that reviews writing companies.