Finding a New Social Circle Amid Senior Living Changes

This is a guest post contributed by MySilverAge.com.

 

The secret to longevity may be as simple as a few good friends.

 

According to a study published in the March 2013 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, social isolation reduces quality of life and actually increases the risk of death. The study of 6,500 men and women ages 52 and older confirmed that people, specifically older adults, need other people to be happy and lead longer lives.

 

However, the circumstances surrounding normal aging tend to make it challenging to maintain a close-knit group of family and friends. There are often fewer opportunities to interact with co-workers and professional networks after retirement—not to mention you may travel to snowbird destinations for winter, children are leaving the nest and good friends pass away.

 

In a new podcast from MySilverAge.com, Dr. Rebecca Shoda-Meyer says these circumstances make it more important than ever to make new friends and avoid isolation. Shoda-Meyer is a clinical pathologist who runs a private practice in Santa Ana, Calif. In the podcast, she shares helpful recommendations for ways seniors can stay connected in social circles, whether moving to a senior living community or aging in place.

 

“Even if you tend to be more of a loner, you can still take classes…or watch a play [so that you’re] around other people and not by yourself at home,” she says.

 

To hear all of Dr. Shoda-Meyer’s advice, download the free podcast, “How to Make Friends and Expand Your Social Circle.”

 

MySilverAge.com offers tips and information on successful aging, retirement and making the most of “what’s next” in your life. The website is brought to you by be.group, one of California’s largest nonprofit providers of senior living communities.

Image via Flickr by marco monetti

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