Archive for the ‘Weekly Roundup’ Category

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Socialization turns out to be important for more than just emotional health. A recent Cornell study shows that loneliness can mimic the effects of aging and contribute to the risk of developing heart disease. Check out ScienceBlog.com for more info.

Senior Living News:

The 2012  ALFA Conference and Expo wrapped up last week in Dallas, Texas. This year’s conference was again a fun-filled and informative event, including the announcement of the ALFA 2012 Hero Awards. Congrats to ALFA for yet another well-executed event!

Should you live alone in your senior years? New research suggests that about one-third of seniors are opting to do so, compared to just 10 percent of the same group in the 1950s. The Huffington Post reports on this growing trend, yet points out that as the end of Social Security and Medicare looms on the horizon, it may become less financially feasible for many seniors to do so. Further, the privacy and proximity to services and support is provided through assisted living, yet for many families, the price tag is out of reach.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

The National Alliance for Caregiving for ReACT has produced an impressive review of best practices for employers when dealing with employees who are caring for an aging loved one. As more and more members of the workforce are serving double-duty, it’s essential for businesses to support their staff.

Loneliness can mimic aging

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One of the hardest parts of caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease is the risk of wandering, which can be dangerous. Caregiving.com offers up a template letter you can use to notify your neighbors and ask for their help in looking out for your loved one.

Tech Roundup:

For obvious reasons, there’s a gap between small and large hospital systems related to the adoption of electronic health record systems (EHRs). InformationWeek says a government incentive for adopting EHR and other promising health IT is widening the gap, pointing to an increase from 15 percent to 22 percent year-over-year between 2010 and 2011.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has implemented a new online tool allowing consumers to monitor the effectiveness of the nation’s healthcare system. Check out GovHealthIT.com for the details.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

Brookdale Senior Living is raising the bar in terms of increasing revenue by focusing on higher acuity units and the continuum of care. Senior Housing News has the story.

While Americans ponder the viability of President Obama’s healthcare plan, other nations are embracing the idea of a universal system of healthcare. Read the rest of the story from The Seattle Times.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

A Pennsylvania nursing home decided to sue the son of a former resident for a $93,000 unpaid bill. John Pittas’mother entered the facility for rehab following a car crash, was discharged and moved out of the country prior to a Medicaid approval glitch being resolved. There are 29 states that permit this type of legal action against a family member in cases like this, but most of the time, it’s not enforced. Mr. Pittas’ appealed the decision but the courts sided with the nursing home. What do you think? Should family members be liable for outstanding bills if a loved one dies or care is discontinued? Check out Forbes for the full story.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Twitter isn’t just for the younger generation. Aging blogger and author Holly Robinson takes a look at how she became a Twitter addict. She was reluctant to try it but found that it’s a great way to get news, drive traffic to sites that are important to her and support others in her network.  Read more about Holly’s love of Twitter at HuffingtonPost’s The Blog.

No Regrets.  A new study in the journal Science reports that letting go of regrets may have be beneficial for maintaining emotional health as we age. A similar study showed that regret has a negative effect on the immune system and hormones. Check out the full story here.

Senior Living News:

In an effort to provide its residents with exceptional care, an assisted living facility in California has partnered with a premier geriatrician. Belmont Vista assisted living community now provides onsite medical care ranging from physical examinations to x-rays and EKGs. Check out the full details here.

The cost of skilled nursing is rising at a much higher rate than that of assisted living. According to a new report released by Genworth Financial, the yearly cost of assisted living is less than half that of a private room in a skilled nursing facility. Check out the full details at Assisted Living Federation of America.

Is your wife talking to you less?

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Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Seniors aren’t just concerned with caring for their aging loved ones, but many are stepping up to care for their young grandchildren. Many are facing financial and emotional difficulties that come with raising children on limited incomes. But, most say they wouldn’t have it any other way. To read more about these loving grandparents check out this story.

A new Canadian report examines the breakdown in the country’s support for caregivers and elderly needing in-home support. Many people with complex diagnoses, like Alzheimer’s disease, are only receiving a few hours more care than those with moderate diagnosis. Read more about the consequences of the limited support at The Globe and Mail.

Tech Roundup:

According to a recently released report, 40 percent of consumers are turning to social networks to find reviews of doctors and learn about treatments and procedure. But, many health care organizations are slow to adopt social media into their practices. Read more on how individuals are using social media to revolutionize their healthcare.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

The Obama administration announced this week that they are expanding the use of competitive bidding for medical equipment. The test program saved money for taxpayers and patients without compromising quality of care. Medicare reports the most common equipment purchased in the program include diabetes testing supplies and oxygen. To learn more, check out The New York Times for the full story.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Have you noticed your wife isn’t speaking to you as often as she used to? You’re not alone. According to a new study, women tend to shift their focus to younger females after their child-bearing years, in what some believe is a shift in thinking from bearing their own children to grandchildren. Read more about this shift in contact at the Ottawa Citizen.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

What’s aging really about? Learning life’s lessons? Working hard, enjoying retirement? Quality time with our grandchildren? According to Dr. Laura Mosqueda, head of geriatrics at the University of California-Irvine, aging is about adapting. As we strive to enjoy life’s blessings, maintain good health and happiness in our elder years, adaptation is the key, Mosqueda says, and the foundation for successfully achieving all those golden desires. Read the full report at SunHerald.com.

Senior Living News:

As Joan London moves painstakingly through the process of attempting to sell her condo so that she can move Westward and closer to family, she finds herself considering a short sale or foreclosure to get out from under her condo in the stalled real estate market. But suddenly, a new option appears: What’s a DIL, and is it the right move for Joan? Read Joan’s latest blog on her search for senior housing and weigh in with your advice.

Stay tuned for a unique look at living with dementia. “You’re Looking at Me Like I Live Here, and I Don’t,” is a new film by Scott Kirschenbaum which aired on select PBS stations at the end of March. (A final airing date is set for April 6th in Washington.) Kirschenbaum initially intended to cast actors for the film, but fate brought him to his unlikely star: Lee Gorewitz, 78, a resident in the dementia unit at Reutlinger Community for Jewish Living in Danville, California. In the end, Kirschenbaum provides an insightful look at living with dementia through the eyes of Gorewitz as she makes her way through her daily routine. The New York Times’ Jane Gross takes a look at the  backstory.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Cindy Laverty offers some wise advice for caregivers: Create a plan in order to maintain balance. With proper planning, undue stress and anxiety can be minimized, reducing the overall adverse effects that can come from being overwhelmed. Read the rest of Laverty’s tips at EzineArticles.com.

Remote-based care monitoring

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Tech Roundup:

Long-Term Living Magazine has released a white paper on the use of technology to improve quality of life. Specifically, the report covers technology provided by “It’s Never 2 Late” and its impact on core elder outcomes related to quality of life through The Green House Project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Live independently with LivIndependa, a new tablet-based remote care service for aging adults launched by LivHOME, a national provider of professional in-home care services. Part of the growing trend of remote-based care services, LivIndependa connects seniors with care managers for medication reminders, check-ins for activities of daily living and a personal emergency response system. The service is ideal for seniors who could benefit from some level of assistance yet don’t require hands-on care.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

The pay-for-performance Medicare test run was a failure, according to a report by Boston.com. The results are disappointing, as the pilot program was the first step in an attempt at redefining the current Medicare payment system in hopes of improving patient outcomes. Despite increased pay for the administration of certain vaccinations and medications and improved counseling for patients with heart failure, the program did not reduce the number of patients who died within 30 days of admission.

Competition isn’t always a good thing, at least when it comes to large-scale hospital systems and health insurance providers. Forbes.com reports on the latest in the continued struggle to reduce healthcare costs by taking aim at insurance providers, discussing the contract negotiations between Highmark, one of Pennsylvania’s largest health insurance providers, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). The contract between the two entities is set to expire in June, and as both insurers and hospital systems scurry to secure a large proportion of the patient population to boost revenues, experts say patients will be the ones losing out in this battle.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Seniors hit the slopes

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Too healthy for a senior discount on a ski pass? Purgatory at Durango Mountain in Colorado thinks so. The resort has scaled back its senior passes in response to increases usage, thanks of course to the growing numbers of active seniors who are still enjoying their love of the slopes. While there was once a silver pass for those aged 62 to 69 and a golden pass for those over 70, Purgatory is now offering only one senior discount pass for those 65 and older. The price tag? About $400.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Throughout our lives, it’s important to feel as though we belong to something or somewhere: a group, a family, a school, a home and so on. But as we age, those groups we’ve felt a part of our whole lives begin to dissolve. In Lewis Richmond’s book, Aging as a Spiritual Practice: A Contemplative Guide to Growing Older and Wiser, he addresses these challenges and offers up some insightful research into belonging as a critical factor of successful aging. Read Richmond’s post at the Huffington Post for the full story.

The Baby Boomer generation has re-written a lot of unwritten rule books throughout a lifetime, and retirement is yet another standard that’s quickly going out of style thanks to the Boomers. The Windsor Star discusses a new retirement trend: Encore careers, or moving beyond traditional careers to embark on a new journey post-retirement.

Senior Living News:

Lifestyle plays a huge role in successful and healthy aging. This Redding.com article addresses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) list of ten recommended preventative care measures.

Resort-Style Retirement

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Are retirement resorts the wave of the future in senior living? The Wall Street Journal highlights the growing trend of fun and lively resort-style retirement.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Dr. Chill provides some great tips for coping when an aging loved one refuses to go to the doctor on ChicagoNow.com.

Time and time again, studies show that caregivers report higher levels of stress. But interestingly, despite these consistent differences in typical health risk factors between caregivers and non-caregivers, research by Dr. Lisa Fredman of Boston university found that caregivers experienced lower mortality rates across an eight-year follow up. Get the full story at Free Alzheimer’s Support.

Tech Roundup:

More opposing views on the implementation of health IT: A new study published in the March issue of Health Affairs finds that physicians who view diagnostic images electronically (i.e., on a PC or tablet) are more likely to order follow-up tests. If this is true, it could mean a rise in costs. At the same time, it could mean that more patients are being appropriately diagnosed and cared for sooner, thus reducing care costs overtime. Read the story at HealthcareITNews.com and tell us your thoughts.

CIO Insight conducts an informative analysis of existing research on health IT, reporting that significant numbers of caregivers and family members believe health IT improves care delivery, saves time and money and reduces many frustrations common in healthcare settings today. Yet, a look at providers indicates that many lack the necessary infrastructure to implement many programs that would prove beneficial. For instance, nearly 60 percent of health IT pros report having to add storage, servers or other programs after complaints of slow systems from users.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

Skyrocketing Medicare costs are at the forefront of many political debates these days. The Obama Administration just took a hit on its health reform law, as the House voted Thursday to abolish the Medicare cost control board created under the law. The New York Times has the full story.

Can hospitalizations speed cognitive decline in the elderly? A new study says yes. Researchers at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center found that cognitive abilities can decrease at twice the normal rate after a hospital stay. Chicago Sun Times has the details.

By 2030, the number of senior citizens identifying themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transsexual is expected to reach 3 million. Because the LGBT population is aging right along with the rest of the world, providers are seeing increasing numbers of LGBT adults within their communities. SAGE has released an informative guide aimed at helping providers offer more effective services through an understanding of the difference in the overall experience of aging and the need for acceptance.

ALFA’s Senior Living Executive Magazine has released its annual roundup of the top ten largest senior living providers.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Want to know what it feels like to be old? Well, now you can, and sooner than you may think. The staff at AgingCare.com participated in an Older Adult Sensitivity Program (wearing special glasses to impair vision and other clothing modifications to emulate the experience of being old) and offered up their own first-person perspectives of the experience.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Are you a “Nevertiree?” It seems as if aging Americans with a high net worth are more likely to continue working, in some capacity, well after the traditional retirement age.  Will you continue working, either for economic reasons or personal satisfaction after 65? Check out Newsweek’s article on “Nevertirees.”

It can’t all be blamed on genetics! In fact, 60 to 70 percent of age-related maladies may be related to a person’s lifestyle and environment, according to a study released by the American Medical Association.  But, if you think it’s easy to control such factors,think again. Check out why changing our lifestyle is easier said than done at Redding.com.

Senior Living News:

Would you consider a senior living community where “quality of life precedes quantity?” Designer and writer David Wilson is hoping to open a community where boundaries are limited and the outdoors is actively utilized as part of the facility. Read more about David’s vision at HuffingtonPost’s The Blog.

Nearly 25 percent of assisted living facilities are now offering skilled services to their residents, according to a new article published by Forbes. The days of hotel-like living are over and many facilities now resemble nursing homes with residents requiring — and facilities providing — higher levels of care than ever before.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Have you ever considered yoga to relieve the stress of caregiving? In a new study, yoga has been proven to lower depression and increase cognitive functioning in the caregiving population.  In addition, it can help lower blood pressure and stress and relieve back pain. Read more about yoga for caregivers at HuffPost Healthy Living.

Nearly 7 million Americans are caring for their aging parents from hundreds or thousands of miles away.  Technology is helping caregivers and their parents cope with the distance, but it does not take away the guilt felt by many who are unable to be by their loved one’s side when it counts the most. Read more at The Daily News.

Seniors may get a break from airport security.

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Tech Roundup:

By 2013, it’s anticipated that 500,000 wireless blood pressure monitors are expected to be in the homes of cardiac patients. Technology advances have been hindered by reimbursement issues, but changes are being made by Medicare, Medicaid and private insurances to help bring life-saving technology to patients’ homes. Read more at DesignNews.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

Despite turning 65, Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is not enrolling in Medicare. He says the system is broken and he plans to continue to pay for private insurance until he is elected into office and can make commonsense reform for the federally funded program. Read more about Romney’s decision at Boston.com.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

It looks like seniors are going to get a break at airports, or at least they won’t have to take off their shoes to get through security. According to New York Daily News, persons over the age of 75 will no longer be forced to remove their shoes when traveling by air. The TSA also says they will reduce the number of pat-downs. Read more and which airports are piloting the new program here.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

Aging News:

It seems that late bloomers may finally have their day in the sun. Vivian Diller, Ph.D., examines how the unique experiences of adolescents may parlay into a positive (or negative) aging experience. Those concerned with looks and status during their younger years may have a harder time accepting the aging process. Learn more at the Huffington Post.

Just because you’re getting older, doesn’t mean you have to give up the things you once loved doing, but you may need to modify them. Aging athletes are finding it’s still possible to compete, but they have to accept that they may not be able to do so in the same way they as when were in their physical prime. Check out more at the Bellingham Herald.

Senior Living News:

According to a Senior Housing News, it’s important that high-volume areas of the home are adapted to help seniors age-in-place. For example, the kitchen can easily be modified to help assist those with movement impairments. For great tips on how to transform your kitchen, read here.

Design modifications for aging in place

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The Harbor’s Edge retirement community in Norfolk, Va., reversed’ a policy that restricted its residents receiving skilled nursing or assisted living care from dining in portions of the independent living center. Now, anyone willing to sign a waiver and obtain doctor’s consent can eat anywhere within the building, allowing families and friends to enjoy meals together. Check out The New Old Age for the full story.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Are you finding yourself wishing for more hours in the day? If you are, consider designing your own caregiver blueprint to help you reflect on important caregiving tasks such as providing hand-on care, balancing work and life, providing safety adaptations and a nurturing environment. Read more from Dr. Chill at ChicagoNow.com.

Despite reporting high levels of stress, caregivers of veterans report being satisfied with their responsibilities. According to the University of Missouri study, only eight percent of caregivers report having high levels of depression. Caregivers who reported the highest levels of satisfaction tended to have the most outside help. Get the details from HealthCanal.com.

Tech Roundup:

In a new survey, 84 percent of caregivers feel that electronic medical records and other healthcare IT solutions are proving beneficial. Doctors and nurses say the availability of better information, the accuracy of care and the opportunity track follow-up care as the top three benefits. However, those providers requiring massive IT overhauls are not seeing the benefits as readily as their tech savvy counterparts. Get more details on the study from ThirdAge.com.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

The advantages and disadvantages of advanced health IT are regularly debated. Learn how one hospital improved efficiency, reduced waste and provided better patient outcomes by using its data in new ways and making important information more readily accessible.Forbes.com has the full story.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

A 31-year old was killed after a portable meth lab exploded in a nursing home resident’s room. The three residents were not injured, according to MSNBC, but were hospitalized. The investigation into the meth lab is continuing and the Ohio Department of Health is investigating the nursing home, which was cited for multiple violations in its annual state survey. A meth lab in a nursing home? No, we’re not kidding.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Can being overweight actually be good for your health? Only if you’re over 85, according to DailyRx.com. It turns out that the same extra weight that can contribute to early death and risk factors like diabetes and heart disease can actually help stave off death in the elderly. Read more to find out exactly why overweight 85-plus-ers tend to live longer.

Now this is lifelong learning! Marilyn Zorn is the oldest student at CMU, at the age of 84. Zorn has taken 29 classes at CMU since 1996, as part of the university’s senior citizen audit program, which provides free classes (for no credits) for adults over 60. Read more at Central Michigan Life.

Senior Living News:

The first full-service senior center dedicated to LGBT aging adults celebrated its grand opening on Thursday. The SAGE Innovative Center caters to specific needs faced by this community during the aging process, such as the loss of a partner. Read more at the Huffington Post.

Many seniors are ready to make the move to senior housing, yet they’re stuck where they’re at due to less than ideal real estate market conditions. Our own Joan London reports on her latest stint in her search for senior housing and tells us why she’s feeling stuck in Baltimore.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Social media can provide a way for caregivers to cope with the daily challenges they face, particularly the element of feeling alone in their plight. Naples News points out that caregivers are free to be themselves and share their emotions when they connect with others via social channels. Read the full story.

Night stand reveals a lot about a person

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Anthony Cirillo, a member of our panel of expert judges for the SeniorHomes.com 2012 Best of the Web contest, has an informative guest post on McKnight’s Long-Term Care News. Cirillo speaks to caregivers, noting its time to come out of the closet in the workforce. He points out that employers must do a better job of readily accepting caregiving situations and providing support for employees in these situations.

Tech Roundup:

They say electronic health records (EHRs) will save healthcare millions, but implementation isn’t so cut-and-dry. CMS has issued Stage 2 guidelines for meaningful use in a document published in the Federal Register. Get the details from eWeek.com.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

So when will ICD-10 come into play? According to Seattlepi, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is considering a delayed compliance deadline for some entities. However, an implementation delay could increase costs and wouldn’t prove beneficial in terms of readiness, according to the article.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Is the nightstand the window to the soul? An article at McKnight’s says you can tell a lot about a person just by looking at their nightstand. The same holds true after the passing of a loved one, when family members are forced to go through a loved one’s belongings. The article is an incredibly insightful read about the many things that can be discovered and questions that can arise just from looking at a person’s nightstand.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Those beautiful eyes actually could be to blame for an onslaught of complex medical conditions, such as memory loss, slower reaction times and even depression. Read the full story at The New York Times.

Yeah, we may be older. But we’re smarter than you! That’s according to Delaware Online, who points out that the U.S. population is not only aging, but becoming more educated. Today, more Americans over 60 have college degrees than ever before.

Senior Living News:

It’s becoming tougher to find a doctor, especially in rural areas, willing to accept Medicare. That’s because Medicare payments to physicians have been on the chopping block for Congress for the past few years, and providers are becoming more and more reluctant to risk losing substantial reimbursements. PolicyMic discusses the “Doc Fix” and what it really means to seniors.

Would you get a tattoo for medical purposes?

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No one wants a colonoscopy, right? Good news: A new study shows that CT colonography is just as effective as the standard method, a colonoscopy. Medical Xpress talks about the findings — and whether this new practice will be adopted by providers and insurance companies.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Caregivers can keep track of a loved one’s appointments, medications and other needs using CareZone, the latest foray into caregiving technology. ComputerWorld has the details.

Tech Roundup:

Pop question: What do tech geeks and doctors have in common? They both look to the root cause to solve a problem. The Montreal Gazette reports on a merging of the two groups in an all-out smarty-pants fest.

The Department of Health and Human Services is getting into the game. The social and tech game, that is. Todd Park, an entrepreneur, has been named the Department’s first-ever Chief Technology Officer, and he has big plans to take what was once a rather mundane government agency to new heights. BusinessWeek has the details.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

It’s true: Provider empathy is a major indicator of positive clinical outcomes. Check out this study by a professor at Thomas Jefferson University and a follow-up that determined it is possible to improve empathy as a skill.

It’s easy to blame the aging population on a host of society’s problems, including healthcare and a poor job market. But the reverse is actually true, as the Colorado Springs Gazette points out, noting that aging Boomers are a benefit to the economy.

Hospital mergers seem to happen nearly every day in today’s economy. But The Metropolitan Corporate Counsel weighs in with insights on the driving forces behind this trend and the potential effects of mergers.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Would you get a tattoo to notify emergency personnel of medical conditions and preferences? Tattoos are becoming a popular alternative to the bracelets most commonly used to alert others to special needs.  ABC News has the story.

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

February brings with it increased attention to heart health. DailyNews weighs in with insight on why exercise is good for the heart — and the body as a whole.

Is aging a disease? AdvanceWeb says no. Check out their article for the full details.

Senior Living News:

More and more Americans age 55 and older are remaining in the workforce, according to a new report by the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute. In both 2010 and 2011, approximately 40 percent remained in the workforce, a figure that increased from 29 percent in 1993. Read the full story at Forbes.com.

e-Prescribing improves med delivery

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One of our esteemed SeniorHomes.com 2012 Best of the Web judges, Anthony Cirillo, features an informative article on About.com Assisted Living about the growing 90+ population and some useful insights on the dynamics of housing for this demographic.

Caregiver Stories and Advice:

AARP never fails to impress with its informative articles, and their recent look at moving elderly parents is no exception. Check out the article for expert tips for moving an aging parent.

Who will care for mom and dad when they grow old? It’s a common conflict among siblings, and one best dealt with before a crisis hits. Detroit Free Press weighs in on the issue.

Tech Roundup:

Our friends at Long-Term Living Magazine report on a new e-prescribing tool meant for use by assisted living facilities and nursing homes. Can e-prescriptions solve the frequent need for emergent meds, and if so, will this be an effective tool in reducing unnecessary hospitalizations?

Re-branding is a strategy sometimes implemented to overcome negative perceptions of local community hospitals. But is this technique actually effective in improving the care offered? As intuition suggests, no. Kurt Miller reports for MLive.com.

What’s up with those nursing home ratings? Medicare’s 5-star rating system was implemented in 2008, to much chagrin by the industry. And as it turns out, it’s tough to shake low ratings. Get the details from Mansfield News Journal.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

When it comes to choosing a senior living facility for a loved one, is for-profit versus not-for-profit a factor? Anthony Cirillo (About.com Guide to Assisted Living and SeniorHomes.com 2012 Best of the Web judge) reports on yet another study indicating that the quality of for-profit facilities, on average, is lower than their non-profit counterparts. Are lower staff ratios to blame?

Home health care companies may soon be required to pay their staffers minimum wage if a proposal by the Labor Department goes through, according to an article in USA Today. According to the report, the industry has used a loophole that’s been in existence since 1974 to exclude nursing assistants and trained comfort providers from the existing minimum wage requirements.

USA Today has been tough on home health this past week. In another report, the paper says that high turnover affects the quality of care provided by agencies.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Getting old doesn’t actually suck. Really! Researchers at the Lifespan Emotional Development Lab (LEDlab) have confirmed it, according to a MedicalXpress article.

Bonus: BMA Management’s Newsletter is chock full of great industry news and insights. Check it out!

SeniorHomes.com Weekly Roundup

This Week in Senior Living News

Aging News:

Alzheimer’s research is at the forefront across the world. A new treatment, discussed by BBC News Health, shows promise of rapidly eliminating brain plagues in mice with the use of cancer drugs.

Senior Living News:

Every person 65 and older wants to take charge of their own health. A new venue, JustGotDiagnosed.com, has listed the top ten tips for taking control of your health in your senior years. Check out the full press release at PRWeb.

RS Fashion Corner has some fun and useful tips for senior citizen fitness.

Retirement

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Caregiver Stories and Advice:

Human Resource Executive talks about the need for employers and HR executives to be aware of the challenges caregivers faced and help employees cope with challenges.

Tech Roundup:

Seniors wanting to learn the World Wide Web can turn to Hello! Home Care for a cool new Facebook app that celebrates extraordinary senior stories.

Astound Technologies, LLC has introduced a new “virtual specialist” tool that enables caregivers and practitioners to seamlessly collaborate.

Operations and On the Political Beat:

Hospital re-branding happens every day. We always hear stories of major companies purchasing local acute care centers. But does this re-branding prove beneficial to patients? Some experts say re-branding doesn’t impact services offered. Check out MLive.com for the details.

What’s up with that pesky nursing home rating system? It’s been touted by experts as a great way for consumers to evaluate the quality of potential facilities, but recent reports indicate one negative rating is hard to shake. Mansfield News Journal has the story.

More on the hospital front: KY3 reports that many patient errors go unreported.

Things that make you say, “Huh?” and our favorite unexpected news of the week:

Will Baby Boomers turn the assisted living model on its head? SeniorHousingNews offers informative insight into why the current model may change in the coming years to meet the demands of this savvy population.

Lonely? Early retirement could be to blame! BBC News tells us why.