Archive for the ‘Senior Living News’ Category

Big Changes to Assisted Living Laws in California

California Gov. Jerry Brown just signed into law 10 of 14 bills aimed at protecting assisted living residents in the state. According to the Sacramento Business Journal, the laws are “designed to address what some say is a crisis of care in assisted living facilities across the state.” The new laws span a variety of components of assisted living, such as additional training requirements for owners of assisted living communities, to statutory rights for residents, and perhaps the most critical change: State regulators now have the ability to suspend admissions to an assisted living community which has received a number of violations deemed to pose a risk to the health and/or safety of residents.

Increased fines and stricter training requirements New California Assisted Living Laws

U-T San Diego notes that the largest fine is now $15,000—for violations resulting in the death of a resident—a marked increase from just $150. This particular bill, focusing on increased fines, was co-authored by Assemblyman Brian Maienschein, R-San Diego, and it applies to all community care facilities in the state, not just assisted living communities. U-T San Diego brought attention to the markedly low fines for serious injury and death in a series of articles which highlighted 27 deaths and hundreds of injuries caused to residents in senior living communities in San Diego county alone, allegedly caused by abuse and neglect. U-T San Diego calls this series of bills “the state’s most sweeping overhaul of the industry in nearly three decades.”

The entire reform package was initiated earlier this year, sponsored by California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, which released its own report last year with some concerning details about residential care in California. Legislators were motivated by this and other reports concerning a lack of adequate oversight in the senior living industry.

Here’s a look at the 10 bills signed into law by Gov. Brown and the focus of each:

  • SB 1153 by Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) – This bill permits state regulators to suspend admissions to a residential care community with violations that place resident health and safety at risk.
  • AB 1570 by Assemblymember Wesley Chesbro (D-Arcata) – This bill outlines increased training requirements for owners of residential care communities in the state, as well as direct care staff.
  • SB 911 by Senator Marty Block (D-San Diego) – Similar to AB 1570, this bill increases training requirements for administrators of residential care communities (rather than licensees) and direct care staff who perform specific duties.
  • SB 1382 by Senator Marty Block (D-San Diego) – Another bill relating to increased training requirements, this bill addresses increased requirements for licensees (owners), administrators, and direct care staff.
  • AB 1751 by Assemblymember Richard H. Bloom (D-Santa Monica) – The signing of this law means that residents in California assisted living communities must now have representation on governing boards of residential care facilities as well as quarterly reporting of financial statements.
  • AB 1899 by Assemblymember Cheryl Brown (D-San Bernardino) – This law, in response to an incident occurring in response to the abandonment of 19 residents at a senior living community at Valley Springs Manor in Castro Valley, now prohibits the reinstating of a license to any licensee who abandons a facility and therefore places residents’ health and safety at risk.
  • B 2044 by Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez (D-Pomona) – This bill addresses specific staffing requirements for residential care communities, along with health and safety requirements.
  • AB 2171 by Assemblymember Bob Wieckowski (D-Fremont) – Establishes statutory rights for residents, and requires the display of resident rights within the senior living community.
  • AB 2231 by Assemblymember Richard S. Gordon (D-Menlo Park) – Re-instates a previous program which provides property tax deferment for seniors and the disabled.
  • SB 895 by Senator Ellen Corbett (D-Hayward) – The signing of this bill means that residential care communities must now rectify licensing deficiencies within 10 days after notification.

Changes are beneficial for residents

These new requirements will now mandate that a CPR-certified staff member be on site at all times. Additionally, senior living community operators are now prohibited from punishing a staff member for calling 911 to obtain help for a resident facing a serious or emergent health concern. Previously, this was discouraged by some operators who believed it to reflect poorly on the community’s ability to provide adequate care, and, in some cases, was discouraged due to the impact transport would create for the community’s occupancy levels. In any case, staff members may now feel confident in seeking the necessary help for residents in emergent situations without fear of repercussion.

Volunteering Promotes Health and Happiness for Older Adults

A new study appearing in the Psychological Bulletin is the first to examine peer-reviewed evidence to investigate the psychosocial health and wellness benefits of volunteerism in the older adult population, according to a report by Psychology Today. It turns out that volunteering has positive impacts on health and happiness among older adults, with particular benefits for those with chronic health conditions.

Meta-analysis looks at the benefits of volunteering on health and wellness Volunteering Benefits Older Adults

The study involved the review of 73 studies, all published within the past 45 years, examining adults age 50 and older who were or are serving in a formal volunteer capacity.All studies reviewed in this analysis the psychosocial, physical, and/or cognitive outcomes associated with volunteering, including:

  • Happiness
  • Physical health
  • Depression
  • Cognitive functioning
  • Social support
  • Life satisfaction

Volunteerism provides numerous positive benefits for older adults

Researchers say they found compelling evidence that volunteerism is a beneficial activity for older adults. A few key findings from the analysis:

  • Volunteering is associated with longevity, fewer symptoms of depression, fewer functional limitations, and better overall health.
  • When it comes to volunteering, more is not always better. The optimal amount of volunteering is about 100 hours annually, or two to three hours per week. After this mark, the benefits of volunteering plateau.
  • Seniors who are more vulnerable, such as those suffering from chronic health conditions, stand to reap the most benefits from volunteering.
  • Volunteering creates a feeling of being needed and/or appreciated, which seems to amplify the overall health and wellness benefits for volunteers.

Increased physical activity adds to the social, emotional, and physical health benefits

One possible reason for some of the health benefits realized through volunteering is the increase in physical activity. Seniors volunteering to deliver Meals on Wheels to aging or disabled adults in their homes are more physically active than those who maintain a more sedentary lifestyle, so seniors are benefiting not only from the social interaction and feel-good benefits of volunteering, but the added physical activity which can help ward off chronic disease.

Specifically, researchers find that a moderate amount of volunteering (around the 100-hours-annually mark) is associated with less hypertension and fewer hip fractures, when comparing seniors who volunteer to those who do not.

Troubling gaps in research points to areas for future study

Researchers also found some intriguing gaps in prior research that may point to future areas of study. For example, they found very few studies which have investigated the link between volunteerism and cognitive functioning. They found not one study that has looked for an association between volunteering and the risk of dementia, or even an association between volunteering and other health conditions that have been previously associated with a higher risk of dementia, such as stroke or diabetes.

With dementia rates expected to double over the next two decades, Nicole Anderson, Ph.D., who led the team of Canadian and American academics in this meta-analysis, encourages researchers to delve into the potential benefits of volunteerism on cognitive functioning in older adults. The research report suggests a “comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests, so that the association of volunteering with the risks of various forms of dementia and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, could be ascertained.”

Do you volunteer in your local community? Tell us about the volunteer activities you enjoy and how volunteering has been beneficial for you in the comments below.

Innovations in Fall Prevention Interventions: Fall Prevention for Older Adults

Fall prevention for older adults has long been a focus of senior-related programs and services. You’ll find ample information online for seniors and caregivers, such as information on getting a fall risk assessment, fall prevention exercises, or even fall prevention checklists for a safer home environment.Preventing Falls in the Elderly

But it’s not enough. Every year, one in every three adults 65 and older will fall, according to the National Safety Council. So researchers at the University of Illinois in Chicago are taking matters into their own hands with an innovative approach to fall prevention: tripping seniors intentionally to train them to avoid falls in the first place.

Falls in the elderly are a serious health risk

A minor trip or fall is one thing, but falls in older adults can lead to serious injuries, such as hip fractures and even head trauma, which take months to recuperate from and often leave seniors with permanent disabilities.

In fact, NIHSeniorHealth, a website providing aging-related information to older adults created by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), names hip fractures as the leading cause of injury and loss of independence among older adults.

Likewise, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) names falls as the leading cause of both non-fatal and fatal injuries among older adults.

In short, it’s a very serious concern for seniors and their loved ones. Fortunately, many falls are preventable, and increased fall prevention is precisely what researchers are trying to achieve with this new program.

Program promotes subconscious learning

According to MedicalXpress, this new approach is based on, “promising, preliminary results with a lab-built walkway that causes people to unexpectedly trip, as if stepping on a banana peel.”

The same concept is being tested with computerized treadmills, and if it works, researchers hope to place specially-designed treadmills in physicians’ offices, health centers and physical therapy clinics to train older adults to avoid future falls.

Clive Pai, a physical therapy professor leading this innovative research effort, says this program focuses on subconscious learning, whereas more traditional fall prevention methods have emphasized muscle training and improvements in range of motion.

The traditional methods do produce some results, but it can take many months of therapy and exercise to adequately strengthen muscles in some patients.

Intentionally tripping older adults proves promising for fall prevention

The research is funded by a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Institute on Aging and hopes to enroll 300 participants within the next five years. It’s promising because the process promotes implicit learning and so far, has proven to train older adults adequately within much shorter time frames than traditional fall prevention techniques.

In preliminary research, participants were strapped to a harness—which helped them maintain their upright position if needed—and hooked up to sensors that would analyze their movements. Research students pressed a button that caused a sliding walkway to move suddenly, forcing participants to struggle to regain their balance.

The results of this preliminary research showed that 24 provoked “trips” in a single session reduced participants’ chances of falling outside the lab setting by 50 percent up to one year later. This research shows promise, although it will likely require several more years of rigorous study to prove its true effectiveness.

More research on fall prevention on the way

Additionally, Medical Xpress reports that the National Institutes of Health is sponsoring a $30 million research effort. This research will evaluate other, mostly conventional fall prevention interventions that can be tailored and adapted to the individual risk profiles and needs of older adults to reduce the number of serious and even minor injuries from falls in the senior population.

As a part of this effort, researchers hope to enroll 6,000 older adults—age 75 and older—at 10 centers throughout the United States.

Fall prevention tips you can use today Exercise for fall prevention

While researchers are working in cooperation with the government to create more effective fall prevention techniques for older adults, there are some steps that you can take today to help protect your elderly loved ones against devastating falls.

  • Participate in muscle-strengthening and balance-reinforcing exercises regularly.
  • Avoid wearing bifocals or multi-focal glasses while walking.
  • Give your home environment a safety run-through, checking for cluttered furniture, loose rugs, cords and other hazards.
  • Add handrails to bathrooms, hallways and other areas where falls are likely.
  • Enhance lighting options in dim areas, and make sure it’s easy to activate lights.
  • Get regular vision exams.
  • Talk with your physician about medication side-effects, such as dizziness or drowsiness.
  • Use a cane or walker if needed for better balance.

Get more fall prevention tips with this helpful fall prevention checklist from the National Safety Council and by reading our article on Preventing Falls and Brain Injury.

Kicking Off National Assisted Living Week: Great Things Happening in Communities Across the U.S.

Yesterday, Sept. 7, kicked off National Assisted Living Week 2014. This year’s theme is “The Magic of Music,” which, according to the National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL), “showcases the integral role that music plays in assisted living residences every day.”The Magic of Music logo

This year’s theme: “The Magic of Music”

“The Magic of Music” theme gives some credibility to the multitude of studies that show music can have positive impacts on people of all ages. “For older individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia, music often has a soothing effect and can also trigger memories long dormant,” according to the NCAL’s Planning Guide & Product Catalog. “Music has the potent ability to enchant and provides the listener with moments of comfort and joy.” This is a phenomenon we’ve talked about before here on the SeniorHomes.com blog.

And, the right music can get anyone up and moving – like this handsome gentleman whose impressive moves quickly garnered the attention of a few lovely ladies:

Assisted living communities are where it’s at this week

Paradise Village in San Diego is just one of many communities with a fun-filled week packed full of lively events planned to celebrate National Assisted Living Week throughout the week. Among their celebrations? An interpretation of Latin music through the dance of Tango, which kicks off the start of the week – which also happens to be Grandparent’s Day.

On Wednesday, the community will host its very own Prom Night, with military guests joining the dance. Other events include a fashion show and students from the San Diego Academy joining residents for song, along with bands and soloists set to entertain all through the week.

Epoch Assisted Living at Melbourne in Pittsfield, MA is hosting an event called “Music and Memories,” featuring June Green and Doug Schmolze, who are performing an interactive music program designed to evoke memories today, Sept. 8. Later in the week, an art opening with Rosemary Daly, featuring Daly’s scenes of the Berkshires, will be held at Epoch, and Daly’s work will remain on display throughout September. And on Wednesday, a drumming event will be held with Aimee Gelinas, according to The Berkshire Eagle.

The Sunrise at Fleetwood is holding a patriotic sing-a-long event, sponsored by Veterans Financial Inc., a financial services company offering education to seniors about the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ Aid and Attendance Pension. The event is open to families of residents, volunteers, staff and their families, and the surrounding community, and will be held on Thursday, Sept. 11.

More ways to celebrate “The Magic of Music”

Each year, the NCAL puts out a comprehensive guide outlining the current year’s theme with some ideas for fun and unique activities that engage both residents and staff, as well as family members and members of the broader community.

This year, in light of “The Magic of Music” theme, NCAL recommends tying in some music therapy concepts to activities programs and even daily interactions with residents, pointing to the growing body of research and everyday experiences that prove beyond doubt that music can evoke deep memories even in individuals with severe memory impairment. The Alzheimer’s Association has some excellent tips and resources for using music in therapeutic ways. Check out this article and this one for some ideas and insights.

Let’s not forget about the value of music in encouraging physical activity. It’s difficult for anyone to stand still when a favorite tune starts playing, so NCAL suggests using the power of music to get residents up and moving this week with fun activities like, “Sweat’n to the Oldies,” an idea that incorporates upbeat, lively music into regular exercise programs offered at communities, or even allowing residents to select their favorite songs from days gone by as the backdrop for the day’s physical fitness program.

Other residents may enjoy a gathering where favorite songs from their lives are discussed, along with the story behind the songs and the song’s significance to their own lives. Many people have songs with significance, such as their wedding song, a song that reminds them of high school, or a song that evokes memories of a long-lost love. This activity is a great way to get residents talking about the events that shaped their lives, and it’s one with the potential to get even the most tight-lipped residents opening up and engaging in conversation.

One thing is for sure: We’d sure like to be a resident in some of these assisted living communities, because it sounds like this week is set to be a blast! What’s your community doing to celebrate National Assisted Living Week this year? Tell us about your plans to celebrate “The Magic of Music.”

Want to Tour a Senior Housing Community? Here’s Some Help

So, you’ve started the search for senior housing, and may have even narrowed down your list to a handful of possibilities. That’s fantastic. But there’s still lots of work to do to find that perfect community, and the task can sometimes seem daunting.

One vital step that can not be overlooked is visiting a community in person. And, really, one visit often isn’t enough. A first visit will usually be a scheduled tour, which is a good way to get an overall view of a community and to ask questions of staff members. But a Happy senior couplesecond, unscheduled visit can also be extremely helpful. This visit can give

There are certain things you’ll want to look for on every tour, no matter what type of community you’re looking for. The neighborhood, the parking, the overall cleanliness, the safety features throughout, the quality of food, the size of an apartment-these are all things you’ll want to keep a close eye on during any visit to any community. And there are plenty of other things to watch out for, too.

But not every community is alike. Depending on the needs of you or your loved one, you may be looking for a community that specializes in assisted living, or memory care, or a nursing home. For that reason, SeniorHomes.com has tour checklists available for many different housing types:

When you think you’re ready to visit a community, we invite you to call one of our Care Advisors, who can help set up your tours and answer any other questions you may have. And when the time comes to take a tour, bring along one of our handy checklists to help spot things you may have otherwise missed.

Medicare’s 5-Star Rating System Under Fire

Medicare’s star-rating system for nursing homes, dubbed Nursing Home Compare, is no stranger to controversy. On its launch in 2008, the long-term care community was up in arms, criticizing the system’s lack of quality metrics that play a key role in resident satisfaction. And a new report by a major newspaper has brought critiques of the system back into the forefront.

New criticisms emerge pointing to flawed ratings

According to a recent article in The New York Times, “The Medicare ratings, which have become the gold standard across the industry, are based in large part on self-reported data by the nursing homes that the government does not verify.”

The article points out that only one of the metrics used to determine a nursing home’s star rating comes from independent reviewers: state inspection data. Staffing ratios and quality measures are self-reported by skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), opening the door for potential abuse of the system.

Criticisms of Nursing Home Compare are nothing new; the program has faced them since its inception. But the content of the complaints has changed course over the years.

Early criticisms of Nursing Home Compare

The American Health Care Association (AHCA) denounced Nursing Home Compare in a public statement, voicing the view that the program “is premised upon a flawed survey system that does not measure quality, lacks the inclusion of other important quality elements that help consumers make informed decisions, and includes inaccurate data.”

The general consensus was that nursing homes could be unfairly portrayed or perceived as providing a lower quality of care, based on technicalities that resulted in deficiencies on state inspections. In other words, a lower five-star rating could be assigned to a skilled nursing community that provides exceptional care, and providers were concerned that they’d lose potential residents as a result of such inaccurate ratings.

Nursing Home Compare

 

Ratings lack critical state complaint data

What’s more, Nursing Home Compare does not take into account complaints filed by consumers with state agencies or fines and other enforcement actions by individual states, only federal actions. The Times points to one community, Rosewood Post-Acute Rehab, a nursing home in a Sacramento suburb, which has maintained a perfect five-star rating for five years, a distinction held by just one-fifth of all nursing homes in the U.S.

But what this rating doesn’t disclose to consumers is the fact that Rosewood was fined $100,000 in 2013, the highest penalty possible, for an accidental, and unfortunately fatal, overdose in 2006. It also doesn’t tell consumers that there have been more than 100 complaints filed in California against this particular nursing home between 2009 and 2013.

California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform, an organization which also tracks complaints, has documented 164 complaints for the same time frame against Rosewood. Officials from Rosewood point out that only a small portion of those complaints have ever been validated, but according to The New York Times, experts say that merely being the subject of that number of complaints is a sign of potential trouble.

But consumers need a clear metric for comparison

While there are some changes coming that will hopefully improve the validity of the Nursing Home Compare rating, such as the requirement that Medicare use payroll data to verify reported staffing levels (required under the Affordable Care Act), a process and system for doing so hasn’t yet been finalized. Best Senior Living Awards Winner Badge

Perhaps of major concern is the idea that a standard, industry-wide rating system is such a valuable metric for consumers. It provides a single point of comparison to help families wade through what can otherwise be a confusing and overwhelming decision-making process. That’s why SeniorHomes.com has created the Best Senior Living Awards, an independent, third-party rating system for assisted living, independent living, and retirement communities.

The Best Senior Living Awards rating system utilizes the opinions of independent senior living experts, along with reviews from residents, staff, and family members, and other quantifiable metrics like state inspection data, to calculate a standard score that consumers can use to easily compare their top communities. Additionally, written reviews are publicly available on SeniorHomes.com, providing consumers with in-depth opinions from others with real-world experience with these communities. Visit any community’s profile on SeniorHomes.com, such as Dunwoody Pines in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia metro area, and access reviews submitted by residents, family members, and staff. And, if you have experience with a senior living community and would like to share your opinion with seniors and their families searching for senior housing options, visit our Post a Senior Living Review page to search for the community and submit your review.

There’s so much information out there about senior living options, yet the choice isn’t an easy one for seniors or their families. There’s a clear need for an independent, third-party rating system that provides a clear, straightforward rating taking into account both quality and compliance, quantitative and qualitative data. And that’s precisely what SeniorHomes.com aims to achieve.

Nursing Home Compare screenshot via Medicare.gov

Older Adult Bullying is On the Rise: How to Cope

Bullying isn’t a problem isolated to kids and teenagers. It’s an issue that spans every age demographic, but as the population ages, it’s becoming an increasingly common problem among senior citizens—particularly those living in communal living settings such as assisted living or independent living.Older adult bullying

Older adult bullying can take many different forms, from offensive jokes to whispering when the victim enters a room, isolating an individual by reserving seats in the dining room and excluding one or more people intentionally, and even actual physical violence. Seniors are sometimes already suffering from depression or feelings of isolation, or perhaps grieving the loss of a spouse or loved one, making older adult bullying a particularly concerning problem.

For senior living communities tasked with providing a warm, comfortable, home-like environment for residents, older adult bullying situations can lead to awkwardness and tension that impacts the well-being of every resident, including those not directly involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator.

Experts like Dr. Linda Rhodes, a former Secretary of Aging and author of “The Essential Guide for Caring for Aging Parents,”suggest a proactive approach to managing bullying, having residents sign standards of conduct agreements and setting clear expectations regarding bullying behaviors. Senior living communities should also conduct periodic needs assessments to pinpoint potential problem areas before situations escalate, and staff should engage in ongoing discussion to identify concerning behaviors to intervene before they lead to bullying.

If you suspect that your loved one is being bullied, or if your loved one expresses feelings of isolation or discomfort due to the actions of others in her community or social circles, there are some coping strategies for you, as well. Visit our article, Coping with Older Adult Bullying in Senior Living Communities, to learn more about older adult bullying and what you can do as a staff member in a senior living community or  a family member of an aging loved one.

Team SeniorHomes.com Joins In the Ice Bucket Challenge in Support of the ALS Foundation

You can’t visit social media these days without seeing images of people everywhere dumping buckets of ice water over their heads.

SeniorHomes.com takes the Ice Bucket Challenge

Team SeniorHomes.com takes the Ice Bucket Challenge!

What’s with all this ice-bucket madness? The Ice Bucket Challenge has gone viral and taken the Internet by storm in support of the ALS Association, with good-natured friends and supporters choosing to subject themselves to freezing-cold water and challenging their friends and loved ones to do the same by nominating them in their own ice water-dumping videos.

The idea is that you can donate to the ALS Association as a means to opt-out of the ice water stunt, but it turns out that there are thousands of people up for a good challenge who are also charitable: Many participants do both.

Ice Bucket Challenge raises millions for ALS Association

Not only is the Ice Bucket Challenge raising awareness of ALS, but it’s produced millions of dollars in donations for the ALS Association — as of August 21, 2014, the total topped $41.8 million, nearly a 25 percent increase from just 24 hours before ($31.5 million as of August 20, 2014).

Last year at this time, the Association had received about $1.9 million in donations, marking a substantial increase in funds that can be used to further research and search for a cure for this devastating disease.

What exactly is ALS?

The U.C. San Diego School of Medicine estimates that about 30,000 people in the U.S. are living with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) at any given time. You may be more familiar with “Lou Gehrig’s Disease,” a moniker commonly used to refer to ALS, which is a “progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord,” according to the ALS Association. About 5,600 people are newly diagnosed with the disease each year.

ALS is a progressive disease, with many patients becoming paralyzed as motor neurons degenerate, resulting in the loss of the brain’s ability to control and coordinate muscle movement. ALS is a devastating, fatal disease, and there is currently no cure.  The average life expectancy for a person newly diagnosed with ALS is two to five years, although it is a variable disease. Life expectancy actually ranges from two to 20 years, sometimes even more:

  • More than half of those diagnosed with ALS will live for three years or more.
  • 20% of people diagnosed with ALS will live five years or longer.
  • Up to 10% will survive for more than 10 years.
  • 5% will live 20 years.

The ALS Association also points out that, “There are people in whom ALS has stopped progressing and a small number of people in whom the symptoms of ALS reversed.” While this provides a glimmer of hope, it’s not enough. That’s the driving force behind the Ice Bucket Challenge: More research can identify better treatments, increase the life expectancy of a larger proportion of ALS patients, and ultimately, produce a cure.

SeniorHomes.com joins the fight and takes the Challenge!

SeniorHomes.com CEO, Chris Rodde

SeniorHomes.com CEO, Chris Rodde

And that’s the reason why Team SeniorHomes.com has joined the fight by participating in the Ice Bucket Challenge. Our COO, Jay Goldstein, was nominated by a friend and dumped a big bucket of ice-cold water over his head and, in turn, nominated our CEO, Chris Rodde. From there, it became a team effort — captured, of course, on video for your viewing pleasure.

But there’s one more video we think you should watch. It’s this one. Why? Because we could never convey the real purpose and the value behind all of this in the same way that this man has. It’s both hilarious and moving — so watch, learn, and share.

SeniorHomes.com Ranks In the Top 1,000 Companies in the Inc. 5000

SeniorHomes.com is thrilled to announce that the company has been recognized in the prestigious Inc. 5000 fastest-growing companies list for 2014. To qualify for inclusion, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2010, and rankings are based on revenue growth from 2013 as compared to 2010 revenue. SeniorHomes.com lands at No. 678, representing a growth of 670 percent in the three-year period between 2010 and 2013.Inc. 5000 logo

This is an exciting accomplishment, as the Inc. 5000 is a widely-respected and recognized ranking of privately-owned companies that has catapulted many brands to widespread success in the past. Brands that are now household names, such as Domino’s Pizza, Dell, Yelp and many others, were recognized in the Inc. 5000 while they were still startups with tons of potential.

There are a few factors contributing to this success. First, a growing elderly population and increasing numbers of family caregivers mean there are more people navigating the at-times-confusing landscape of senior housing and senior care. Companies like SeniorHomes.com provide a valuable, free service to these families who aren’t sure where to turn for help or how to begin their search. Second, SeniorHomes.com has worked hard to cultivate and maintain a positive, supportive company culture throughout phases of rapid growth and the inevitable challenges that statups face along the path to success.

“When people talk about the Inc. 5000, they talk about innovation,” says Chris Rodde, CEO of SeniorHomes.com. “At SeniorHomes.com, we emphasize a company culture that motivates our already-exceptional team to reach higher and achieve more. We try to cultivate an environment in which our team feels empowered to develop and pursue ideas that drive our company forward – a difficult thing to achieve in the modern business world – and that’s where true innovation lies, in the power of the collective.”

Our exceptional team is comprised of: compassionate and talented Care Advisors working with seniors and caregivers every day; expert writers who provide valuable content to help seniors and their families understand the many complexities of senior housing, senior care and aging; developers who work tirelessly to build and maintain the comprehensive national database and community rating system; and the many supporting staff members who handle various important tasks day in and day out. We all work together in a supportive and collaborative environment to ensure that SeniorHomes.com provides the best possible resources and services for the aging population.

All of this, of course, works in tandem to further the mission and realize the vision of our executive leadership team, who are responsible for cultivating a culture in which every employee feels valued and empowered to thrive. So far, it’s proven to be a winning combination, and we look forward to many more successes in the future as we continue to implement new ideas and find more innovative ways to provide valuable services to seniors and their loved ones.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the success of SeniorHomes.com!

Marijuana Laws Throw a Monkey Wrench in Senior Living Operations

The legalization of marijuana for medicinal use has created some interesting challenges for the senior living industry, only further complicated by the recent legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes in Colorado and Washington State.

With state and federal laws clashing in states which have legalized marijuana for medicinal or recreational use, senior living operators in these states must carefully craft policies to minimize legal risk. And that, it seems, is no simple matter. Medical marijuana challenges assisted living

While the Obama Administration has taken the stance that the federal government will not—and federal prosecutors should not—penalize prescribing physicians or approved patients or caregivers in states which have passed laws legalizing marijuana, it’s unclear what the future holds and presently, the government still classifies marijuana as a Schedule I Controlled Substance. That means it’s deemed to have a high potential for addiction and has “no currently accepted medical use.”

Senior living providers are taking approaches ranging across the spectrum, with some permitting the use of medicinal marijuana but not centrally storing or dispensing it as they would another prescription medication. In this case, residents using marijuana for medicinal purposes must have a caregiver who can assist and obtain it via a third-party, outpatient provider — but these circumstances aren’t free of obstacles, either.

For some providers, the risk is too great to take, and they opt to prohibit the use of medical marijuana within their communities altogether to play it safe.It’s an interesting landscape that’s sure to change in the coming years, and will likely be a heavily-debated issue in the next presidential election. Until then, the policies of individual senior living providers are the determining factor in whether it’s possible to use marijuana for medical purposes as a resident in a senior living community.

For more on this widely-debated issue and where the current regulations stand, check out our article on the impacts of the legalization of marijuana on the senior living industry.